penofhearts

Live, Learn and Grow

In my previous post I have shared the review of the book, When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. In this post I am going to share lines (quotes) from this book that I liked.

There must be a way, I thought, that the language of life as experienced – of passion, of hunger, of love – bore some relationship, however convoluted, to the language of neurons, digestive tracks, and heartbeats.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 39)

Paul had passion for both Science and Literature. He wanted to find the meaning of life and death in both Science and Literature.

Cadaver dissection epitomizes, for many, the transformation of the somber; respectful student into the callous, arrogant doctor.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 44)

A cadaver may not sound as interesting to common people as it sounds to doctors. Cadavers are interesting to doctors as they learn new things and with experience they master the human body. Cutting a dead body (a dead human body) is not a fun. Studying different organs of a dead human body is not a fun at all.

Cadaver reverse the polarity. The mannequins you pretend are real; the cadavers you pretend are fake.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 45)

Humans are organisms, subject to physical physical laws, including, alas, the one that says entropy always increases. Diseases are molecules misbehaving; the basic requirement of life is metabolism, and death its cessation.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 70)

Because the brain mediates our experience of the world, any neurological problem forces a patient and family, ideally with a doctor as a guide, to answer this question: What makes life meaningful enough to go on living?

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 71)

Neurosurgery seemed to present the most challenging and direct confrontation with meaning, identity, and death.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 73)

The call to protect life – and not merely life but another’s identity; it is perhaps not too much to say another’s soul – was obvious in its sacredness.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 98)

Good intentions were not enough, not when so much depended on my skills, when the difference between tragedy and triumph was defined by one or two millimeters.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 105)

Death comes for all of us. For us, for our patients; it is our fate as living, breathing, metabolizing organisms. Most lives are lived with passivity toward death – it’s something that happens to you and those around you.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 114)

Death is real and each one of us has to face it. Death becomes difficult when it comes to us. Its hard to believe but we have to face it one day.

You cant ever reach perfection, but you can believe in an asymptote toward which you are ceaselessly striving.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 115)

Before my cancer was diagnosed, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. After the diagnosis, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. But now I knew it acutely. The problem wasn’t really a scientific one. The fact of death is unsettling. Yet there is no other way to live.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 131-132)

Yes, all cancer patients are unlucky, but there’s cancer, and then there’s CANCER, and you have to be really unlucky to have the letter.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 133)

Cancer is so scary. It scares us to the core. Cancer is a deadly disease, terminal disease, as mentioned in this book. The feelings of the author are clear as a patient and as a doctor.

Torn between being a doctor and being a patient, delving into medical science and turning back to literature for answers, I struggled, while facing my own death, to rebuild my old life – or perhaps find a new one.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 139)

After so many years of living with death, I’d come to understand that the easiest death wasn’t necessarily the best.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 143)

Death may be a one-time event, but living with terminal illness is a process.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 161)

Human knowledge is never contained in one person. It grows from the relationships we create between each other and the world, and still it is never complete.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 172)

Part of the cruelty of cancer, though, is not only that it limits your time; it also limits your energy, vastly reducing the amount you can squeeze into a day.

Paul Kalanithi (When Breath Becomes Air, Pg: 196)

While reading the book, I got lost in the pain and sufferings of the author and missed many good sentences. I recommend this book to everyone who like reading non-fiction books.

Thank you for stopping by and reading the post.

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